Research

Dr. Cameron Greensmith has come to Kennesaw State University from Ontario, Canada. His research and writing falls into three areas of expertise: 1) Understanding LGBTQ youth inequality, self-injury, and suicide; 2) Expanding LGBTQ service providers’ methods to support Indigenous, Black, and people of color communities; and, 3) Examining discrimination within professions working with children and youth. When woven together these three areas inquire as to how professionals in positions of power can unlearn, give up, and work against oppression marginalized communities face.

BOOKS
 
Greensmith, C. (under contract). White Settler Colonialism and Queer Professionals. University of Toronto Press.
 
PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLES
 
Greensmith, C., & Sakal Froese, J. (under review). Negotiating Livability In a Cruel World: Reading and Responding to Rape Culture in 13 Reasons Why. Girlhood Studies.
 
Greensmith, C., & King, B. (accepted). "Queer as Hell Media:” Affirming LGBTQ+ Youth Identity and Building Community in Metro Atlanta, Georgia. Journal of LGBT Youth.
 
Greensmith, C., & King, B. (revise and resubmit). Y’all Means All: Negotiating Queerness in the American South. QED: Journal of GLBTQ Worldmaking.

Sakal Froese, J., & Greensmith, C. (2019). Que(e)rying Youth Suicide: Sexism, Racism, and Violence in Skimand Thirteen Reasons Why. Cultural Studies Review. 25(2), 31-51.

Greensmith, C., & Rodriguez, D. X. (2018). Practicing Storytelling and Learning from Migrant Youth. NEOS, 10(2), 14-15. 
 
Greensmith, C., SakalFroese, J. (2018). Glorifying Suicide?: Radical Encounters with Difficult Texts, Radical Approaches to Youth Care. CYC-Online, 235, 70-78. 

Greensmith, C. (2018). (Unsettling) White Queer Complicities: Toward a Practice of Decolonization in Queer Organizations. Intersectionalities: A Global Journal of Social Work Analysis, Research, Polity, and Practice, 6(1), 16-36.
 
Greensmith, C. (2018). Desiring Diversity: The Limits of White Settler Multiculturalism in Queer OrganizationsStudies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, 18(1), 57-77.
 
Greensmith, C., & Sheppard, L. (2017). At the Age of Twelve: Migrant Children and the Disruption of Multicultural BelongingChildren & Society, 32(4), 255-265.
 
Greensmith, C. (2016). The Management of Indigenous Difference in Toronto’s Queer Service Sector. Settler Colonial Studies. 6(3), 252–264.
 
Greensmith, C., & Giwa, S. (2013). Challenging Settler Colonialism in Contemporary Queer Politics: Settler Homonationalism, Pride Toronto, and Two-Spirit Subjectivities. American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 37(2), 129–148.
 
Greensmith, C. (2012). Pathologizing Indigeneity in the Caledonia “Crisis.” Canadian Journal of Disability Studies, 1(2), 18–42.
 
Giwa, S., & C, Greensmith. (2012). Race Relations and Racism in the LGBTQ Community of Toronto: Perceptions of Gay and Queer Social Service Providers of Color. Journal of Homosexuality, 59(2), 149–185.
 
PEER REVIEWED BOOK CHAPTERS
 
Greensmith, C. (under review). Thinking With and Across Queer and Trans Theories. In Shaikh, S. S., & LeFrançois, B. A., (Eds.), Social Work Theory ↔ Critical Praxis. Canadian Scholars Press.
 
Greensmith, C., & Davies, A. (2017). Queer and Trans at School: Gay–Straight Alliances and the Politics of Inclusion. In Chen, X., Raby, R., & Albanese, P (Eds.), The Sociology of Childhood and Youth Studies in Canada: Categories, Inequalities, Engagement. (pp. 314 – 331). Canadian Scholars Press.
 
Greensmith, C. (2015). Bathhouse encounters: Settler colonialism, volunteerism and Indigenous misrecognition. In C. Janzen, D. Jeffery & K. Smith (Eds.), Unraveling Encounters: Ethics, Knowledge, and Resistance under Neoliberalism. (p. 95–125). Wilfrid Laurier Press.
 
REVIEWS
 
Greensmith, C. (2015). Book Review, Settler Common Sense: Queerness and Everyday Colonialism in American Renaissance. American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 39(2), 158–159.

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